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Passing of former All Black and President Snow White mourned by New Zealand Rugby

allblacks.com     14 Jul 2016    

 
Hallard Leo White, known in rugby circles as Snow, was born on 27 March 1929 in Kawakawa. The durable prop made his All Blacks debut in 1953 and played 16 matches, including four Tests. He later served as President of both the New Zealand and Auckland Rugby Unions.

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"It is with real sadness that we mark the passing of Snow White," said New Zealand Rugby Chairman Brent Impey.

"We know that Snow will be fondly remembered around New Zealand this week and in particular by the Auckland rugby community that enjoyed his services for such a long time. Snow made an immense contribution to rugby as a player and then as a coach, administrator and supporter of rugby and the All Blacks. Our thoughts are with his family and friends at this sad time."

White made his debut for Auckland in 1949 and went on to play 196 times for them, a record that still stands today. Noted for his ability to play on either side of the scrum as well as his durability and energy, White was selected for the All Blacks' lengthy 1953-54 tour of Ireland, the United Kingdom and France.

The 24-year-old White made his debut against Cambridge University and scored a try in the 22-11 win. White made his Test debut against Ireland two months later. He played fifteen matches on tour, including three Tests. His final appearance for the All Blacks was in 1955, against Australia.

He continued to play for Auckland until 1963. On hanging up his boots, he coached at the Northcote club and was assistant coach for Auckland. He also served as President of what was then the New Zealand Rugby Football Union in 1990, after performing the same role for Auckland Rugby in the late 1980s. He was just the seventh former All Black to be elected President of the national body.

White received his All Blacks cap in 2009, when New Zealand Rugby retrospectively presented caps to All Blacks who had made their Test debuts between 1946 and 1996.

For more information, view Hallard White's profile on allblacks.com.